Best Personal Health Books

These books will give you the tools to live healthier, physically and mentally.


Born to Run by Christopher McDougall

Print | E-Book

When McDougall hurt his foot, he wanted an answer as to why that was. This book was the result. Whether you are a runner or not, this is a fascinating account of a journey from science labs to tribes of distance runners. It makes many bold but captivating assertions. At worst, Born to Run will make you want to move. At best, it could change how you see yourself.


Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle by Tom Venuto

Print | E-Book

This book covers everything that most people could ever want to know about physical health. It goes over weight-loss, exercise, nutrition, and even advice on how to stay motivated. It’s simple, and it lacks much of the disorienting noise that often comes out of the fitness world. For the average person, Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle has it all.


Food Rules by Michael Pollan

Print | E-Book

Pollan is a journalist who has written extensively about nutrition and food. His previous works have received both wide acclaim and some criticism. That said, this concise book is difficult to argue with. It’s short, sweet, and to the point. It provides straightforward advice on how to eat better, and his general rules of thumb are memorable and practical. It’s a great place to start.


Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Print | E-Book

This is a quite vivid narrative of what it means to live with depression and anxiety. Haig was on the verge of committing suicide at age 24, and this book takes us on a journey from there. He shares his reasons for choosing to live and how he has learned to cope with his illnesses. It’s a valuable read for anyone suffering. And maybe more importantly, for those who never have.


Waking Up by Sam Harris

Print | E-Book

Harris is a famous public intellectual and neuroscientist. In Waking Up, he explores the idea of spirituality outside of faith. Given the subject matter, it won’t sit well with everyone. That said, Harris combines science and rationality to make a case for a richer life through mindfulness. It’s an easy introduction to meditation for anyone who is curious.

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